Just What I Kneeded

What happens after a life-altering knee injury?

Down on the farm

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I spent some time on the farm this weekend, and I thought I’d share some pictures so you can see why it’s my favorite place on Earth.

First, because he’s the most important, is my rescue llama. Loosely translated, his name means “sweetheart.” It’s a long story for another day how he came to be in my life, but he has certainly enriched it. He’s a stud. Literally. Which means that he likes to run around and make sure that everyone knows he’s special. That makes it easy to get a good picture because he’s constantly posing (posturing).

This picture is kind of funny because, if you look closely, you can see his cud. It’s the lump on the left side of his face (right side in the picture). Llamas are pseudo-ruminants, so they chew cud. It’s kind of gross, re-chewing your food like that. Oh, and by pseudo-ruminant, I mean llamas have three compartments in their stomach. True ruminants, like cows, have four compartments in their stomachs. Sorry. I’ll stop schooling now and start showing more pictures.

Llama stud.

My sweetheart.

I love that there are few close neighbors. Below is a picture of one of the hay fields on the north side of the farm. The front part of the picture is one of the pastures. The back part–the part that looks like a mown lawn–is the actual hay field. We’d just baled this one the day before I took the picture.

Hay field.

A view of one of the hay fields on the north side of the farm.

Speaking of baling, what you see below is one of the most useful machines on the farm–the hay elevator. This moves the bales from the wagon into the mow. Of course, we still have a lot of work getting the hay onto the elevator and then stacked in the mow, but this little machine does the heavy lifting.

Hay elevator.

One of the best machines on the farm.

The Case tractor is used to do the raking, and the bigger John Deere to do the baling. My mom tells people she had green blood because she grew up with John Deere tractors, and that’s all she’ll consider a “real” tractor. My brother and his boys are all guilty of the same obsession. But this Case does an awful lot of good work.

Case tractor.

The old Case that pretty much does it all.

This is the tread of the John Deere tractor. The most important thing about this bad boy is that it has air conditioning in the cab. It’s my kind of tractor.

John Deere tractor tire tread.

Tread lightly.

The llamas in the largest of the north pastures are girls and geldings (castrated males), and they’re mostly all retired or 4-H llamas who are only worked for a portion of the year. The rest of the year, they lay around being lazy.

Llama herd.

A few of the ladies and geldings in the north pasture.

I have no clue where he came from, but the pelican that stands watch at the corner of the horse barn has been there for as long as I can remember. I think, at one point, he had a bird bath, but that’s long gone. Now, he just stands watch.

A pelican bird bath.

The watchful pelican.

There are tons of flowers in bloom this time of year. They add so much color and life to the place; it wouldn’t be the same without them.

Roses.

Roses on the lane.

Purple flowers.

Some lovely purple flowers on the lane.

That’s it for now. I don’t usually have my camera at the farm because I’m there working, but I’ll try to remember to take it more often.

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Author: Laura

I have a fern I named Frankenstein. I like leprechauns, practicing kung fu moves on my dining room furniture, and pretending that one day I will move to Fiji. I dislike my neighbors' kids, anything that is chartreuse, and Ben Roethlisberger.

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